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Practice at your own peril





I am anxious, insecure, and always afraid of being wrong. What is worse, I am always afraid that the person who says I’m wrong is better than I am.
Hence, I need to check quickly the ideas that come into my head, and always state with some jovial unease that it is quite possible that I might be wrong. In spite of being quite sure of its correctness.

While not stating my ideas at all may seem like the easier route - I have found that insecure persons (like I) often cannot delay indefinitely and it is hard for them to develop their ideas in silence, waiting for the “truth” to be suddenly revealed to them. That is why, I like to discover, to expand - these still imperfect ideas and bear people’s reactions.
A difficult game, because it does not always consist of being reassured when you meet with argument and having doubts when you are faced with dissent.
Sometimes, you have to follow the opposite course: Distrust agreement and find in dissent the confirmation of your own intuitions. There is no rule, there is only the risk of contradiction.
But sometimes, you have to speak because you feel the moral obligation to say something, not because you have the “scientific” certainty that you are saying it in an unassailable way.

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